Started KTM

jhwalker
Fourth Gear
Posts: 2962
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:04 pm
Location: Central Mexico

Re: Started KTM

Post by jhwalker » Tue Aug 02, 2016 6:36 pm

Tetge wrote:If you purchased a KTM instead of a Ducati you would not have needed a powerplate as the KTM vibrates in 100's of directions at no extra cost. You could have been riding for therapy. :-D
:lol:

User avatar
xbacksideslider
Second Gear
Posts: 751
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 10:38 am

Re: Started KTM

Post by xbacksideslider » Wed Aug 03, 2016 12:28 pm

Good for you James, I read progress and determination there.

User avatar
Tetge
Fourth Gear
Posts: 2434
Joined: Fri Sep 12, 2008 12:00 pm

Re: Started KTM

Post by Tetge » Thu Aug 04, 2016 1:42 pm

Since stats have been released that show that an average motorcycle rider in the good old USA would weigh perhaps 210 pounds, or so, suited up, one has to wonder why KTM suspended the US spec 690 Duke for a rider with a max 180 pound suited up weight? And, also, why KTM refuses to bring the R model with much superior suspension and a better front brake, to the US? The KTM comes from Austria, and it is not as if the Germans are tiny little people, is it? In fact, the un-cramped ergos of the bike are quite accommodating for large people. It really makes no difference since I am going to sell my Duke as soon as I can ascertain a good, attractive, price for it. Hard to get a feel for pricing as not too many used 690's on the market. Great bike and great to ride, but, the vibrations do not play well with my previously nerve damaged hands. This is not a major concern for some as there are many reports of 500 mile trips on 690 Dukes on the NET with zero complaints about the vibrations.

Just saying as I needed a post to keep my status as #1 poster intact.

The information about weights:

The average weight of U.S. men over the age of 20 has increased to 195.7 pounds, according to data from 2011 to 2014. The former average, 180.7 pounds, was based on data from 1988-1994. The heights of both men and women remained about the same. The average woman in 1960 weighed 140.2 pounds. Today, the average weight for a woman is 168.5 pounds.

jhwalker
Fourth Gear
Posts: 2962
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:04 pm
Location: Central Mexico

Re: Started KTM

Post by jhwalker » Fri Aug 05, 2016 1:51 pm

Tetge wrote:Since stats have been released that show that an average motorcycle rider in the good old USA would weigh perhaps 210 pounds, or so, suited up, one has to wonder why KTM suspended the US spec 690 Duke for a rider with a max 180 pound suited up weight? And, also, why KTM refuses to bring the R model with much superior suspension and a better front brake, to the US? The KTM comes from Austria, and it is not as if the Germans are tiny little people, is it? In fact, the un-cramped ergos of the bike are quite accommodating for large people. It really makes no difference since I am going to sell my Duke as soon as I can ascertain a good, attractive, price for it. :lol: get mountain bike gloves... Hard to get a feel for pricing as not too many used 690's on the market. Great bike and great to ride, but, the vibrations do not play well with my previously nerve damaged hands. This is not a major concern for some as there are many reports of 500 mile trips on 690 Dukes on the NET with zero complaints about the vibrations.

Just saying as I needed a post to keep my status as #1 poster intact. I need to start posting some. :think:

The information about weights:

The average weight of U.S. men over the age of 20 has increased to 195.7 pounds, according to data from 2011 to 2014. The former average, 180.7 pounds, was based on data from 1988-1994. The heights of both men and women remained about the same. The average woman in 1960 weighed 140.2 pounds. Today, the average weight for a woman is 168.5 pounds.

User avatar
xbacksideslider
Second Gear
Posts: 751
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 10:38 am

Re: Started KTM

Post by xbacksideslider » Tue Aug 09, 2016 3:12 pm

Took the Honda out to go to a meeting, 10 out, 10 back.
Neck got tired each way. So, still need the PT work. :cry:
Gotta figure though that the Honda has clip-ons.

A sit up 690 would take a load off my neck. :dance:

User avatar
Tetge
Fourth Gear
Posts: 2434
Joined: Fri Sep 12, 2008 12:00 pm

Re: Started KTM

Post by Tetge » Tue Aug 09, 2016 4:09 pm

Rode shaker four times the past three days. A couple of days ago I got some grips, that said that they eliminated vibration, at Cycle Gear. And then yesterday I hit Harbor Freight and also returned to Cycle Gear as I decided that I needed some grip glue and a pair of safety wire twisting pliers. I changed the clutch side grip and it may have helped a wee bit, but, it still numbs my hand. However, when I rode back to Cycle Gear for the glue, the bike suddenly did not want to shift cleanly.

So, last night I adjusted the chain, which takes a weird KTM ritual and I trimmed the round end guard of the replacement grip as it was hitting the clutch lever when it was fully depressed. Also, on the suggestion of Brakelate, I inspected for any play in the clutch that could be removed, but, this is not present on the KTM's hydraulic setup, although there is some adjustment that only moves the lever in or out from the handlebar. Since the new grip may have been just a small bit bigger around than the OEM grip, I checked the lever and found that it was adjusted all the way in so I moved it out three clicks, which my eye could not even see.

Finally I checked the oil, which is another KTM ritual since one has to get the engine to operating temp, and then let it sit one minute and then check the oil level in a round sight window way down under the engine. And, one has to hold the bike level with the kickstand located on the opposite side of the bike, and the hot header pipe right there on the side that needs to be checked. I however, after trying to get low on the ground and then somehow pull the KTM level, have out smarted the KTM boys, as I got a cheap 5' mirror designed to hang on a door, and I use it to check the oil level while I stand and hold the bike vertical. Generally I do this as I put the bike away after finishing a ride. But, the big single does use oil, and it only holds 1.7 liters (1.8 qt). It was 250ml down, or 14.7% low, so I filled it up with $24 per liter KTM spec oil.

I then went for a test ride out Mt Emma to the Forest Hwy and back and the shifting issues were gone. Fussy the shaker is, but, I can say that it was nice to ride otherwise since it accelerates to speeds of around 100 mph quite nicely, not that I would do such a thing. And, it sounds pretty good doing it, not that I would hear such a thing. And, it handles pretty well, or so I have been told. I have to confess that going for a bit of a ride cheered me up.

User avatar
Tetge
Fourth Gear
Posts: 2434
Joined: Fri Sep 12, 2008 12:00 pm

Re: Started KTM

Post by Tetge » Tue Aug 09, 2016 7:48 pm

I forgot to mention how life long motorcycle riders all have to get back on a bike after something prohibits this and how emotional, and uplifting, that first return to riding can be. It actually has brought a tear of joy to my glass eye when I was able to jump on a bike and ride after some horrible sprain or an operation where the surgeon said that I should be cautious, etc. So riding the Honda should have been an important event, even if you were sore afterward.

As Brakelate and I used to say, after we rode hours in sub zero conditions and were completely afflicted with frost bite: "WE RIDE". And, we'd laugh, because at that point there was no other more appropriate response. It seems that all long term riders are a bit crazy. Or, is is everyone else?

User avatar
xbacksideslider
Second Gear
Posts: 751
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 10:38 am

Re: Started KTM

Post by xbacksideslider » Wed Aug 10, 2016 11:30 am

Well written. Enjoyed those two posts. :clap:

Post Reply

Return to “Breakfast Rides”